Category Archives: Just … what?

Titles that defy the imagination.

So many have felt it…

The Fellowship of the Hand.  By Edward D. Hoch. Stoneshire Books, London, 1981. I’m just being childish again, aren’t I? And I’m not sure why, but the cover and the breathless synopsis … Jazine got in the way — so

So many have felt it…

The Fellowship of the Hand.  By Edward D. Hoch. Stoneshire Books, London, 1981. I’m just being childish again, aren’t I? And I’m not sure why, but the cover and the breathless synopsis … Jazine got in the way — so

Children can be cruel

Children’s authors even more so. Having invented an unkindly childish nickname for her protagonist, the author proceeds to use it relentlessly all the way through. Lead by example: that’s what I say! Thistledown Tony.  By Constance Savery. Victory Press, London,

Children can be cruel

Children’s authors even more so. Having invented an unkindly childish nickname for her protagonist, the author proceeds to use it relentlessly all the way through. Lead by example: that’s what I say! Thistledown Tony.  By Constance Savery. Victory Press, London,

There’s a Ladybird book for everything

Tasseltip and the Boozle. By Sarah Cotton. Illustrated by Earnest Aris & Roy Smith. Ladybird Books, London, 1975. I mean … really? Is this someone’s joke, or did no one put even a second’s thought into this? I very often

There’s a Ladybird book for everything

Tasseltip and the Boozle. By Sarah Cotton. Illustrated by Earnest Aris & Roy Smith. Ladybird Books, London, 1975. I mean … really? Is this someone’s joke, or did no one put even a second’s thought into this? I very often

At it again!

Enid Blyton, I mean. Hello, Mr. Twiddle! By Enid Blyton. Dean & Son, London, (this edn, 1968). Was Mr Twiddle a friend of Mr Pinkwhistle? I’m a little afraid to read it — I might find out.

At it again!

Enid Blyton, I mean. Hello, Mr. Twiddle! By Enid Blyton. Dean & Son, London, (this edn, 1968). Was Mr Twiddle a friend of Mr Pinkwhistle? I’m a little afraid to read it — I might find out.

Tragedy comes in many guises

Cut off from Crumpets. Margaret J Baker, Methuen, London (duh), 1964. Such an English title, and such an English double entendre, but very much of the book’s time. But according to the blurb, it was very cold in England in

Tragedy comes in many guises

Cut off from Crumpets. Margaret J Baker, Methuen, London (duh), 1964. Such an English title, and such an English double entendre, but very much of the book’s time. But according to the blurb, it was very cold in England in

Adventures in trade

Pet and the Baby she Bought. By Faith Chiltern. Epworth: London, nd (circa 1925). Another from the ‘random babies are Improving for Girls’ genre, only this time she’s gone to greater lengths to get one. And it seems to mean

Adventures in trade

Pet and the Baby she Bought. By Faith Chiltern. Epworth: London, nd (circa 1925). Another from the ‘random babies are Improving for Girls’ genre, only this time she’s gone to greater lengths to get one. And it seems to mean

How very awkward

The Enemy in the Mouth. By Joseph Kessel, London, Hart-Davis, 1961. (Translated from the French by Frances Partridge.) Well, at least it said enemy, I suppose. For those of you unfamiliar with the work, its subtitle is: An Account of

How very awkward

The Enemy in the Mouth. By Joseph Kessel, London, Hart-Davis, 1961. (Translated from the French by Frances Partridge.) Well, at least it said enemy, I suppose. For those of you unfamiliar with the work, its subtitle is: An Account of