Category Archives: Unfortunate associations

Near misses that I collected anyhow, or those that are guilty by association.

And the darkest mystery of all…

Who was wearing them? The Mysterious Trunks. Curiously, although we know the illustrator (Jack Crowe), no author has stepped forward to take responsibility for this exotic juvenile pot-boiler.  (Raphael Tuck — fine art publishers to Their Majesties the King and

And the darkest mystery of all…

Who was wearing them? The Mysterious Trunks. Curiously, although we know the illustrator (Jack Crowe), no author has stepped forward to take responsibility for this exotic juvenile pot-boiler.  (Raphael Tuck — fine art publishers to Their Majesties the King and

Does yours have a special sign?

The Sign of the Beaver. by Elizabeth George Speare. New York: Dell, 1983. What more to say? Shall I bore you with the observation that I don’t think I’ve ever seen such a confusion of publication information on so slight

Does yours have a special sign?

The Sign of the Beaver. by Elizabeth George Speare. New York: Dell, 1983. What more to say? Shall I bore you with the observation that I don’t think I’ve ever seen such a confusion of publication information on so slight

I wonder what the sequel is called?

Blackcock’s feather: A plain cloak-and-sword story rendered from the Scots and Gaelic. Maurice Walsh, W&R Chambers, 1932. I like how the usual ‘cloak-and-dagger’ plainly isn’t sufficient for Mr Walsh. Read the sequel, Blackfeather’s Cock to find out more about that

I wonder what the sequel is called?

Blackcock’s feather: A plain cloak-and-sword story rendered from the Scots and Gaelic. Maurice Walsh, W&R Chambers, 1932. I like how the usual ‘cloak-and-dagger’ plainly isn’t sufficient for Mr Walsh. Read the sequel, Blackfeather’s Cock to find out more about that

How very awkward

The Enemy in the Mouth. By Joseph Kessel, London, Hart-Davis, 1961. (Translated from the French by Frances Partridge.) Well, at least it said enemy, I suppose. For those of you unfamiliar with the work, its subtitle is: An Account of

How very awkward

The Enemy in the Mouth. By Joseph Kessel, London, Hart-Davis, 1961. (Translated from the French by Frances Partridge.) Well, at least it said enemy, I suppose. For those of you unfamiliar with the work, its subtitle is: An Account of

…if a wood-pecker could peck wood…

One-a-pecker, Two-a-pecker. Ruth Park, Melbourne, Angus & Robertson (1959, Book Club edn) Well, naturally, this is about the Otago gold rush of the 1860s. But that still doesn’t answer the question. Either question: Firstly, how much wood would a wood-pecker

…if a wood-pecker could peck wood…

One-a-pecker, Two-a-pecker. Ruth Park, Melbourne, Angus & Robertson (1959, Book Club edn) Well, naturally, this is about the Otago gold rush of the 1860s. But that still doesn’t answer the question. Either question: Firstly, how much wood would a wood-pecker

And just while we’re out West…

I’m just going to slip this one on, sidle away casually, and let you make up your own mind whether or not it belongs. Roy Rogers Cowboy Annual World Distributors, Manchester, 1959

And just while we’re out West…

I’m just going to slip this one on, sidle away casually, and let you make up your own mind whether or not it belongs. Roy Rogers Cowboy Annual World Distributors, Manchester, 1959

Antibiotics might help with that

Rimfire on the Prod Charles Ballew, London: Wright & Brown, 1944 It just sounds so uncomfortable: no wonder he looks like he’s in a bad mood. Also, just to add insult to … unfortunate condition … it seems that he’s

Antibiotics might help with that

Rimfire on the Prod Charles Ballew, London: Wright & Brown, 1944 It just sounds so uncomfortable: no wonder he looks like he’s in a bad mood. Also, just to add insult to … unfortunate condition … it seems that he’s