Category Archives: Unfortunate associations

Near misses that I collected anyhow, or those that are guilty by association.

So many have felt it…

The Fellowship of the Hand.  By Edward D. Hoch. Stoneshire Books, London, 1981. I’m just being childish again, aren’t I? And I’m not sure why, but the cover and the breathless synopsis … Jazine got in the way — so

So many have felt it…

The Fellowship of the Hand.  By Edward D. Hoch. Stoneshire Books, London, 1981. I’m just being childish again, aren’t I? And I’m not sure why, but the cover and the breathless synopsis … Jazine got in the way — so

For those who are tired of Dick and Jane

We present this mild variation. Jane and Winky. By Beth Coombe Harris. Stirling Tract Enterprise, Stirling, nd (hard to tell anytime from the 1920s to the 1950s). The subtitle of this stirring work of adventure and religion is: The story

For those who are tired of Dick and Jane

We present this mild variation. Jane and Winky. By Beth Coombe Harris. Stirling Tract Enterprise, Stirling, nd (hard to tell anytime from the 1920s to the 1950s). The subtitle of this stirring work of adventure and religion is: The story

Children can be cruel

Children’s authors even more so. Having invented an unkindly childish nickname for her protagonist, the author proceeds to use it relentlessly all the way through. Lead by example: that’s what I say! Thistledown Tony.  By Constance Savery. Victory Press, London,

Children can be cruel

Children’s authors even more so. Having invented an unkindly childish nickname for her protagonist, the author proceeds to use it relentlessly all the way through. Lead by example: that’s what I say! Thistledown Tony.  By Constance Savery. Victory Press, London,

There’s a Ladybird book for everything

Tasseltip and the Boozle. By Sarah Cotton. Illustrated by Earnest Aris & Roy Smith. Ladybird Books, London, 1975. I mean … really? Is this someone’s joke, or did no one put even a second’s thought into this? I very often

There’s a Ladybird book for everything

Tasseltip and the Boozle. By Sarah Cotton. Illustrated by Earnest Aris & Roy Smith. Ladybird Books, London, 1975. I mean … really? Is this someone’s joke, or did no one put even a second’s thought into this? I very often

And the darkest mystery of all…

Who was wearing them? The Mysterious Trunks. Curiously, although we know the illustrator (Jack Crowe), no author has stepped forward to take responsibility for this exotic juvenile pot-boiler.  (Raphael Tuck — fine art publishers to Their Majesties the King and

And the darkest mystery of all…

Who was wearing them? The Mysterious Trunks. Curiously, although we know the illustrator (Jack Crowe), no author has stepped forward to take responsibility for this exotic juvenile pot-boiler.  (Raphael Tuck — fine art publishers to Their Majesties the King and

Does yours have a special sign?

The Sign of the Beaver. by Elizabeth George Speare. New York: Dell, 1983. What more to say? Shall I bore you with the observation that I don’t think I’ve ever seen such a confusion of publication information on so slight

Does yours have a special sign?

The Sign of the Beaver. by Elizabeth George Speare. New York: Dell, 1983. What more to say? Shall I bore you with the observation that I don’t think I’ve ever seen such a confusion of publication information on so slight

I wonder what the sequel is called?

Blackcock’s feather: A plain cloak-and-sword story rendered from the Scots and Gaelic. Maurice Walsh, W&R Chambers, 1932. I like how the usual ‘cloak-and-dagger’ plainly isn’t sufficient for Mr Walsh. Read the sequel, Blackfeather’s Cock to find out more about that

I wonder what the sequel is called?

Blackcock’s feather: A plain cloak-and-sword story rendered from the Scots and Gaelic. Maurice Walsh, W&R Chambers, 1932. I like how the usual ‘cloak-and-dagger’ plainly isn’t sufficient for Mr Walsh. Read the sequel, Blackfeather’s Cock to find out more about that