Posts Tagged: 1920s books

And the darkest mystery of all…

Who was wearing them? The Mysterious Trunks. Curiously, although we know the illustrator (Jack Crowe), no author has stepped forward to take responsibility for this exotic juvenile pot-boiler.  (Raphael Tuck — fine art publishers to Their Majesties the King and

And the darkest mystery of all…

Who was wearing them? The Mysterious Trunks. Curiously, although we know the illustrator (Jack Crowe), no author has stepped forward to take responsibility for this exotic juvenile pot-boiler.  (Raphael Tuck — fine art publishers to Their Majesties the King and

The notable sequel

Kiddie of the Camp. By Robert Leighton.  Pearson, London, 1922. This, of course, is the absolutely fabulous sequel to Kiddie the Scout. Which is a vast relief for me, because I’ve already made all of my camp kiddie jokes. You

The notable sequel

Kiddie of the Camp. By Robert Leighton.  Pearson, London, 1922. This, of course, is the absolutely fabulous sequel to Kiddie the Scout. Which is a vast relief for me, because I’ve already made all of my camp kiddie jokes. You

He’s back

Yes, it’s Coppernob in his first adventure, but second appearance here! Coppernob Buckland, by Lawrence R Bourne, Humphrey Milford/OUP (n.d., but 1920s or early 30s I’d say) Find the sequel here. This copy still had a loose publisher’s blurb inside

He’s back

Yes, it’s Coppernob in his first adventure, but second appearance here! Coppernob Buckland, by Lawrence R Bourne, Humphrey Milford/OUP (n.d., but 1920s or early 30s I’d say) Find the sequel here. This copy still had a loose publisher’s blurb inside

For our Australian readers

The Date Boy of Baghdad, by the Reverend Cocker. London, HR Allenson Ltd, circa 1925. The subtitle is ‘Thirty-five story-talks to young people’, and the Rev J Cocker was keen on primitive Methodism and prohibition. So, clearly, he needed other

For our Australian readers

The Date Boy of Baghdad, by the Reverend Cocker. London, HR Allenson Ltd, circa 1925. The subtitle is ‘Thirty-five story-talks to young people’, and the Rev J Cocker was keen on primitive Methodism and prohibition. So, clearly, he needed other

Adventures in trade

Pet and the Baby she Bought. By Faith Chiltern. Epworth: London, nd (circa 1925). Another from the ‘random babies are Improving for Girls’ genre, only this time she’s gone to greater lengths to get one. And it seems to mean

Adventures in trade

Pet and the Baby she Bought. By Faith Chiltern. Epworth: London, nd (circa 1925). Another from the ‘random babies are Improving for Girls’ genre, only this time she’s gone to greater lengths to get one. And it seems to mean

Feel the wind in your riah

The Camp at Sea View Meadow. K.N. Abbott, Blackie, London nd. circa 1929. Well, it’s not very funny, or even very camp, but it’s just adorable, isn’t it? The prose is dire, but I’d expect nothing less. This is one

Feel the wind in your riah

The Camp at Sea View Meadow. K.N. Abbott, Blackie, London nd. circa 1929. Well, it’s not very funny, or even very camp, but it’s just adorable, isn’t it? The prose is dire, but I’d expect nothing less. This is one

You’ve heard of Pope Joan

Well, meet King Anne. (Ethel Turner, Ward Lock, London/Melbourne, 1921) Can you imagine how much trouble we’d have been saved down the centuries if someone had come up with this solution to the various problems of primogeniture sooner?

You’ve heard of Pope Joan

Well, meet King Anne. (Ethel Turner, Ward Lock, London/Melbourne, 1921) Can you imagine how much trouble we’d have been saved down the centuries if someone had come up with this solution to the various problems of primogeniture sooner?