Posts Tagged: elegantly veiled dick jokes

Don’t be shy: I know that’s why you’re here really.

For those who are tired of Dick and Jane

We present this mild variation. Jane and Winky. By Beth Coombe Harris. Stirling Tract Enterprise, Stirling, nd (hard to tell anytime from the 1920s to the 1950s). The subtitle of this stirring work of adventure and religion is: The story

For those who are tired of Dick and Jane

We present this mild variation. Jane and Winky. By Beth Coombe Harris. Stirling Tract Enterprise, Stirling, nd (hard to tell anytime from the 1920s to the 1950s). The subtitle of this stirring work of adventure and religion is: The story

There’s a Ladybird book for everything

Tasseltip and the Boozle. By Sarah Cotton. Illustrated by Earnest Aris & Roy Smith. Ladybird Books, London, 1975. I mean … really? Is this someone’s joke, or did no one put even a second’s thought into this? I very often

There’s a Ladybird book for everything

Tasseltip and the Boozle. By Sarah Cotton. Illustrated by Earnest Aris & Roy Smith. Ladybird Books, London, 1975. I mean … really? Is this someone’s joke, or did no one put even a second’s thought into this? I very often

Which side?

Fly Dressing and Some Tackle-Making. By WE Davies. Elliot’s Right Way Books, Surrey, 1963. My favourite chapter is 14: Lures, Demons, Terrors and Streamers. You’d have to be really poorly dressed to get that sort of reaction, surely? Or maybe

Which side?

Fly Dressing and Some Tackle-Making. By WE Davies. Elliot’s Right Way Books, Surrey, 1963. My favourite chapter is 14: Lures, Demons, Terrors and Streamers. You’d have to be really poorly dressed to get that sort of reaction, surely? Or maybe

Just for the record, how many exactly?

A Man Every Inch of Him. By J. Jackson Wray. Nisbet & Co, London, n.d. (very difficult to judge). I think we should all just take a moment now, to appreciate the sublime jacket illustration (marked ‘Cav Sanders’). I suspect

Just for the record, how many exactly?

A Man Every Inch of Him. By J. Jackson Wray. Nisbet & Co, London, n.d. (very difficult to judge). I think we should all just take a moment now, to appreciate the sublime jacket illustration (marked ‘Cav Sanders’). I suspect

We’ve all worked with a few

Working with Tools for Fun and Profit.  By A Fredrick Collins. New Home Library, Philadelphia, 1946. (not the Fredrick Collins, please note) I must say that I’m rather taken by the cover illustration. Here we are in the 40s, when

We’ve all worked with a few

Working with Tools for Fun and Profit.  By A Fredrick Collins. New Home Library, Philadelphia, 1946. (not the Fredrick Collins, please note) I must say that I’m rather taken by the cover illustration. Here we are in the 40s, when

He’s back

Yes, it’s Coppernob in his first adventure, but second appearance here! Coppernob Buckland, by Lawrence R Bourne, Humphrey Milford/OUP (n.d., but 1920s or early 30s I’d say) Find the sequel here. This copy still had a loose publisher’s blurb inside

He’s back

Yes, it’s Coppernob in his first adventure, but second appearance here! Coppernob Buckland, by Lawrence R Bourne, Humphrey Milford/OUP (n.d., but 1920s or early 30s I’d say) Find the sequel here. This copy still had a loose publisher’s blurb inside

I wonder what the sequel is called?

Blackcock’s feather: A plain cloak-and-sword story rendered from the Scots and Gaelic. Maurice Walsh, W&R Chambers, 1932. I like how the usual ‘cloak-and-dagger’ plainly isn’t sufficient for Mr Walsh. Read the sequel, Blackfeather’s Cock to find out more about that

I wonder what the sequel is called?

Blackcock’s feather: A plain cloak-and-sword story rendered from the Scots and Gaelic. Maurice Walsh, W&R Chambers, 1932. I like how the usual ‘cloak-and-dagger’ plainly isn’t sufficient for Mr Walsh. Read the sequel, Blackfeather’s Cock to find out more about that