Posts Tagged: so childish

Get it while you can

That Exciting Holiday. By Nigel Strong. London, C.S.S.M (Children’s Special Service Mission?), nd (guess: 1940s). Treasure! Burglars! Philately! Adventure! Rescues! Reward money! all ‘Interwoven with the theme of divine mercy’ — so you know it’s got to be exciting. (I

Get it while you can

That Exciting Holiday. By Nigel Strong. London, C.S.S.M (Children’s Special Service Mission?), nd (guess: 1940s). Treasure! Burglars! Philately! Adventure! Rescues! Reward money! all ‘Interwoven with the theme of divine mercy’ — so you know it’s got to be exciting. (I

Nice to have a classic on board

The African Queen. By CS Forester. Michael Joseph, London, 1946 (this edition 1970). I love being able to return to classic works with fresh eyes. You never know what you’ll suddenly notice. (Is this a classic? It was a classic

Nice to have a classic on board

The African Queen. By CS Forester. Michael Joseph, London, 1946 (this edition 1970). I love being able to return to classic works with fresh eyes. You never know what you’ll suddenly notice. (Is this a classic? It was a classic

And the darkest mystery of all…

Who was wearing them? The Mysterious Trunks. Curiously, although we know the illustrator (Jack Crowe), no author has stepped forward to take responsibility for this exotic juvenile pot-boiler.  (Raphael Tuck — fine art publishers to Their Majesties the King and

And the darkest mystery of all…

Who was wearing them? The Mysterious Trunks. Curiously, although we know the illustrator (Jack Crowe), no author has stepped forward to take responsibility for this exotic juvenile pot-boiler.  (Raphael Tuck — fine art publishers to Their Majesties the King and

He’s back

Yes, it’s Coppernob in his first adventure, but second appearance here! Coppernob Buckland, by Lawrence R Bourne, Humphrey Milford/OUP (n.d., but 1920s or early 30s I’d say) Find the sequel here. This copy still had a loose publisher’s blurb inside

He’s back

Yes, it’s Coppernob in his first adventure, but second appearance here! Coppernob Buckland, by Lawrence R Bourne, Humphrey Milford/OUP (n.d., but 1920s or early 30s I’d say) Find the sequel here. This copy still had a loose publisher’s blurb inside

An awfully pink adventure

The Adventures of Mr Pinkwhistle. Enid Blyton, Newnes, London, 1950. (Illustrated by Dorothy Wheeler) Read all about this Secret Little Man and what he gets up to on a Marvellous Afternoon with Jimmy, the Girl with the Broken Doll, the

An awfully pink adventure

The Adventures of Mr Pinkwhistle. Enid Blyton, Newnes, London, 1950. (Illustrated by Dorothy Wheeler) Read all about this Secret Little Man and what he gets up to on a Marvellous Afternoon with Jimmy, the Girl with the Broken Doll, the

You’ve heard of Pope Joan

Well, meet King Anne. (Ethel Turner, Ward Lock, London/Melbourne, 1921) Can you imagine how much trouble we’d have been saved down the centuries if someone had come up with this solution to the various problems of primogeniture sooner?

You’ve heard of Pope Joan

Well, meet King Anne. (Ethel Turner, Ward Lock, London/Melbourne, 1921) Can you imagine how much trouble we’d have been saved down the centuries if someone had come up with this solution to the various problems of primogeniture sooner?

And just while we’re out West…

I’m just going to slip this one on, sidle away casually, and let you make up your own mind whether or not it belongs. Roy Rogers Cowboy Annual World Distributors, Manchester, 1959

And just while we’re out West…

I’m just going to slip this one on, sidle away casually, and let you make up your own mind whether or not it belongs. Roy Rogers Cowboy Annual World Distributors, Manchester, 1959